This is how you tell a story

There is a moment in the Shadowmoon Valley experience that is one of the most supremely heroic and noble and tragic and triumphant of the game so far. Nothing in all the expansions or the original game can match this for emotional punch or impact. It is truly one of the Big Moments of video gaming. This is a genuine “Aeris moment”. The people at Blizz that are responsible for this should take each other out for copious rounds of hard cider and pizza; they’ve achieved a high point in this franchise. I state this without hesitation.

Those of you that have seen the cinematic sneak peeks, or completed this zone, know of that which I speak.

And yet that there is more to the story of Shadowmoon Valley. You still have work to do, and you’re inspired to do so.  And that, friends, is the point of a good cinematic.  It drags you in and involves you in the story.


There is a scene before this in which you are involved in the final battle to save Karabor. You are participating in a future-vision with alt!Velen, and in the dream you fight beside him and Yrel. Just as things look grimmest, alt!Velen cries out and gives rise to the Holy Light, and the enemy begins to fall back!  And then there is evil laughter, and Ner’zhul, and then … well, I won’t spoil it, but if you were there, you probably whispered … “oh, gods, no.”  It was that bad.

As I and alt!Velen awoke from this nightmarish dream, I felt a resolve … “Hell, no!”  Just that.  The thing that we saw. We’ve seen it before. And regardless of the outcome of the previous event that we have seen before, the cost is just so damned high. Never again.

Never again.


After That Cinematic Moment, the game kicks into high gear.  The moment of supreme sacrifice cannot be dwelled upon. The Iron Horde is storming Karabor!  You know now that the nightmare of alt!Velen’s vision will not come to pass. But will it be enough?

I hope you have the music playing, because they milk it for all it’s worth as you, Yrel, and Maraad take to the skies as air support for your garrison’s denizens as you all, together, storm the city. Your job is to plow the road so the garrison troops can break through to the docks.

Once accomplished, you link up with Yrel after taking out a mini-boss ((Honestly, I have no idea how Jas or Illume are going to survive that dude without a tanky pet.)) and end up once again in the final defense of Karabor.  Will the Aeris moment pay off?

Of course it does, but the final moments of the battle are involving and emotional.  If you can imagine a Dwarf riding a giant rooster, his rampaging polar bear at his side, yelling FOR [REDACTED]!!!! at the top of his wee Dwarven lungs, charging into battle as if he’d forgotten that he never quite mastered the art of shooting and moving at the same time, well, you’ve got a good handle on where I was living for five minutes of my life.

At the end, you’re given a ride back to Embaari, where the music swells, speeches are made, and the natives cheer you and your doughty troops for, well, as long as you stick around, it looks like. The moments of tragedy, tension, and triumph all culminate in this final moment, in which you not only get to bask in the glow of your own sense of achievement, but share it with the people that you were fighting for.  Again, it was quite an emotional moment.


Here now, in the wee hours of the morning, I hurry to push that emotion out onto virtual page before it’s gone. It’s not enough to feel it; I want to share what it’s like, even though I know that this sense is completely derived from pixels and logical constructs living inside a silicon wafer.  And I just don’t care.

A year ago, I was mocking Blizzard for many reasons, and justifiably so.  They appeared to be inept, tone-deaf, and downright hostile to the culture they said they were a part of.  Boy, a year does make one hell of a difference. Blizzcon 2014 saw a complete about-face, right down to the host of the cosplay event. The Overwatch reveal was a huge success ((I’m not into that kind of game, but by the Light it was one hella reveal, even a jaded old husk like me can admit that.)), the outreach felt genuine, and the tone of the game launch, while marred by a DDoS and subsequent messy mop-up ((Which, despite the bleats of the nonbelievers, was done in cracking good time.)) was aimed squarely at us, the gamers.

I’ll proudly be among the first to step up to the buffet and eat a large plate of crow.  If Shadowmoon is any indication at all, this game has received a much needed injection of “Panda? What’s a fucking panda?”

Story matters. It has to be a good story. It has to be a relevant story. I’m sure some poor fellow worked long and hard on the Pandaria lore, but bottom line is, nobody cared.

Draenor, for all the contrivance involved in its invocation, is nevertheless relevant, in spades.  And the story of Draenor thus far is, by the Light, GOOD. I know the high spots of what’s coming, but this zone.  Guys, this goddamned zone. Tears of anguish. Tears of betrayal.  Tears of hopelessness. Tears of loss. Tears of joy. Tears of triumph.

A very moist zone, this Shadowmoon Valley.

I don’t know if I’m emotionally up to coping with what is yet to come.  And I damned well don’t know if I’m up to bringing three more alts through this zone over the next month or two.  But for some reason, I have the feeling that the giddy feeling that I get coming out of it will make it worth the while.

Game on, nerds.

Advertisements

Posted on November 22, 2014, in Broken promises and shattered dreams, Expansions, Lore. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: